Nationalism in Italy


#1

Are Italians living in Italy nationalistic? Are you patriotic to the sovereignty and security of your country and its people? I read from Britannica that Italy’s “Nationalism was inspired by the French Revolution”. And that political and military groups throughout Italy heroically led the people into independence and freedom from “the old autocratic regimes” and raised up dedicated leaders to govern their newly birthed unifed Italian state.

I think there is a lot more to be researched and understood about Italy.
What can you contribute to my interest?


#2

I’m not Italian by nationality, but my grandparents were - and I would say that they were quite patriotic, even once they’d left Italy. I’m not sure though about the current climate in Italy and whether or not that nationalism is still a big thing…but I do think on the whole, Italians are passionate people so maybe that’s part of it!


#3

You’re probably right. One’s loyalty and passion is always to his/her own motherland of birth, I suppose. But if we are in another land, we must assimilate well with the values and laws of the land we emigrated in. Thanks.


#4

I think alot of people enjoy and are protective of their nationality. Being Italian is not much different than other nationalities. It is just one of the things that people like about where they live.


#5

I have noted that in general, there is no clearly expressed nationalism in Italy. It is a modern country, populated by people with progressive views.

As for the Europeans, the Italians have different relations with them. It all depends on what country the tourists come from. The relations between the Italians and the French are rather strained. The French are rather arrogant, and it irritates open, simple and cheerful locals.


#6

The rise of nationalism in Italy and Germany were two major events that dominated European history after 1815. The ideals of liberty, equality, and fraternity from the French Revolution appealed to the people of Italy. The reduction of the number of states into the Kingdom of Italy, Papal States, and the Kingdom of Naples and Sicily, along with introduction of reforms by the Napoleonic regimes between 1796 and 1814 unleashed the forces of nationalism.


#7

To be quite frank, I don’t really know how nationalistic Italians are in general. I know that generally, Italians are quite a passionate people, and this passion often extends towards their cultural heritage as well. I’ve worked with several actual Italians who came to work in my country temporarily, and they seemed to be very enthusiastic about their culture.

That being said, they didn’t seem overly nationalistic in that they took great pride in their government or anything like that. It was on a more cultural level than political.