Italian citizenship via residence


#1

For someone who is wanting to move to Italy. What is the process to get an Italian citizenship/residence and how long does it take for that to happen?


#2

There are different rules regarding Italian citizenship.

For those coming from countries within the European Union, you need 4 years of uninterrupted residency (doesn’t matter if you moved from one county to another, what’s important is not to have ‘gaps’).
Those who come from outside the European Union, 10 years of uninterrupted residency is needed.

However, that’s not all. You also need to have a pristine clean criminal record and also enough financial resources to sustain yourself (which shouldn’t a problem if you have a regular job or a business registered in Italy).

As far as how long it takes to acquire it, I really couldn’t say. It depends on how each file is being processed, but in any case, it takes at least a couple years or longer.


#3

Very interesting! It seems like it is a bit easier to get residency in Italy than it is in the USA.


#4

Well, citizenship is not the same as residency. And residency isn’t always easy to obtain, to be honest. You’d have to prove you have a roof over your head and for that you need a contract with your landlord. To find rent, you need to prove you have a stable income. To have a stable income you must… well, find a job :sweat_smile:
It’s not difficult either, but for someone planning to move to Italy, finding a job ahead of time is a smart thing to do.


#5

Very resourceful!! Thanks


#6

I will likely consider this option, especially with the thriving tourism industry of Italy. Its gonna be fun spending sometime here.


#7

Citizenship would be nearly impossible afaik unless you were born there or lived there for fairly long. One of my Airbnb hosts was not italian, but had come there via a Job opportunity and had been living there for 35 years!


#8

I don’t think it would happen without marriage. Italy simply doesn’t need people (more than likely) unless it’s some highly skilled person, and probably there is competition for that. Anyhow, what about ESL teachers? They need them in Eastern Europe.


#9

True, but still, so many foreigners come to Italy anyway. In fact, the percentage of foreigners in Italy grows years after year. And the majority don’t have special skills, they take simple jobs, that don’t even pay very well, but are needed to obtain residency in order to stay.

Italy may not need more people, but they certainly don’t turn anyone away. If you insist on it, you can find simple job, start at the bottom and work your way up in a few years :slight_smile:


#10

I think you could make a “donation” to the country to get citizenship, but that would have to be pretty sizeable, I know Canada has such an “inves in the country” sort of thing!